NWU Vaal: Diversity in the workplace explored and celebrated

Anjonet Jordaan -- Wed, 09/23/2015 - 15:05

NWU Vaal: Diversity in the workplace explored and celebrated

The North-West University’s (NWU's) Vaal Triangle Campus offers a challenging honours programme in Labour Relations Management. Each year students from this programme present to the campus community a day that celebrates and explores different cultures in South Africa and abroad.

Active discussions took place in between role-plays on what diversity in South Africa means in practice. Various traditional cuisine was served during Diversity Day. Two honours students acted as continuity presenters for the day.
Active discussions took place in between role-plays on what diversity in South Africa means in practice. Various traditional cuisine was served during Diversity Day. Two honours students acted as continuity presenters for the day.
Exploring diversity in religions and religious practices. With quite a bit of humor students explored how organisations can accommodate age diversity in their workforce.. A diversity of culture represented by students.  
Exploring diversity in religions and religious practices. With quite a bit of humor students explored how organisations can accommodate age diversity in their workforce. A diversity of culture represented by students.  

The theme of the 2015 diversity day was ‘Diversity in the South African Workplace’. Students tackled a number of topics such as different religious beliefs and practices, communication gaps, age discrimination, disability, and customs related to culture. Students wrote and performed mini plays that depicted both the wrong and correct way to deal with such differences in the South African workplace.

“The main purpose of Diversity day is to make people aware of the true and real diversity that exists in all South African companies. The students dress according to the traditional attire of the chosen countries they represent, and also serve the traditional food of their respective countries. Through their role plays, the different groups show some of the core diversity issues that are experienced within all companies in South Africa. The aim is to create an awareness of the importance of understanding, accepting, and respect for the differences between people in our organisations, as well as to embrace diversity as a key element for success in any organisation in our country,” explains Dr Leon Moolman from the subject group Labour Relations within the School of Behavioural Sciences.

 

What does Labour Relations encompass?

Labour Relations is also known as Industrial Relations and Employment Relations, and is an interdisciplinary field of study that has evolved from both a practical and theoretical point of view. This means that students gain a clear understanding of what the field of labour relations entails, how it came about and who the role-players are. To understand the role-players, students also study labour relations from the perspective of management.

Each and every employment relationship in its totality (including everything that may negatively affect it, may relate to it in a way or may improve it) has to be managed in such a way that the outcome or consequences thereof have a positive influence on the survival, longevity and ultimate success of the organisation. Simply put, a labour relations practitioner or manager seeks to ensure that labour relations in an organisation are managed in such a manner that they positively impact the achievement of the organisation’s objectives.

 

The Honours Programme in Labour Relations Management

The Honours programme on the Vaal Triangle Campus are presented through contact sessions that mainly consist of formal lectures, role plays, group discussions, and facilitation sessions.

 

The programme curriculum includes the following modules

  • Organisational Behaviour
  • Research Methodology
  • Advanced Labour Relations
  • Labour Market Principles
  • Industrial Sociological Theories and Social Change
  • Work Wellness
  • Organisational development
  • Human Capacity Building
  • Group Dynamics
  • Research Report
  • Applied Labour Relations
  • Human Resource Management Strategies
  • Collective Bargaining and Negotiation

 

 

The minimum criteria to be invited for the formal selection day (subject to capacity) are:

  • A relevant and applicable Bachelor-degree, with Labour Relations and Industrial Psychology as majors.
  • Undergraduate statistics. A minimum combined average of at least 60% for the following NWU modules: LARM211, LARM221, LARM311, LARM321, LARM322 (if part of the degree), IOPS211, IOPS221, IOPS311, IOPS321, STTN111, and STTN124 (if part of the degree).
  • Applicants from other universities must include full certified academic record (including full module code descriptions as well as module outcomes of all the modules).
  • Formal selection will take place over the course of two days during November (dates will be communicated to all applicants that adhere to the minimum criteria as set out.
  • Admission to the Honours program in Labour Relations Management is subject to the results of the formal selection process as well as capacity.

Applications for 2016 closes end of September 2015. All applications must be submitted at Academic Administration (Building 24 on Campus). The contact person at Academic Administration is Mr Tumi Lesole 016 9103093

 

For more detailed information on the Labour Relations Management Honours Programme, contact:

Dr Leon Moolman
Subject chair: Labour Relations Management
E-mail: Leon.moolman@nwu.ac.za
Tel: 016 910 3421