Faculty of Humanities

Nina Brink

Nina Brink achieved a BA in Communication Studies, and BA Hons and MA in Afrikaans and Dutch at the North-West University's Potchefstroom campus. Her specific research focus is on Afrikaans children's first language acquisition. This is an underexplored theme in the field of Afrikaans linguistics. Nina works within the framework of functional/usage-based and cognitive linguistics, and also specialises in Afrikaans language editing. Her research forms part of the Subprogram: Descriptive Linguistics of the Research Unit for language and literature.

Marita Heyns

Marita Heyns is a researcher in the Optentia Research Entity of the NWU. She has a PhD in Psychology and a Master degree in Business Administration (MBA) as academic background. Her interests generally reflect Positive Psychology and Positive Organizational Scholarship related topics. She has a particular interest in the development of models for interpersonal- and organizational trust within workplace contexts characterised by transition and uncertainty. Through her research, she strives to promote pathways for individuals and organisations to flourish.

Itumeleng Mekoa

1. Qualifications

  1. BTh (1992)  University of Natal
  2. M.A ( 1992)  University of Natal
  3. PhD (2000) University of the North

2. My academic areas of specialization and interests

African Studies, Education and Politics, Culture and Education, Sociology of Education, Education Policy.

Gordon Matthew

In 2010, Gordon Matthew attained a BA-degree in Computational Linguistics at the North-West University’s (NWU’s) Potchefstroom Campus. In 2013, he attainted a MA-degree in Language and Literary Studies at the NWU’s Vaal Triangle Campus, the thesis topic focusing on the development of a Dutch Named Entity Recogniser. Gordon is also part of the UPSET Research area and is part of a sub-area that focuses on Audio-Visual translation and Eye Tracking. Gordon is currently busy doing his PhD on different ways to determine and measure cognitive load while a person reads subtitles.

Ronel Wasserman

My research career started in 2009 when I began compiling the Historical Corpus of South African English, consisting of personal and business letters, news reportage, fiction and non-fiction from all over the country, and spanning from the 1820s to the present. I became more and more interested in the grammatical and semantic changes that occurred within this unique variety of English over time.

Tumi Khumalo

My research career began in 2007 when I joined the North-West University as a Senior Lecturer. I later enrolled for a PhD and completed a thesis entitled “The evaluation of the General Psychological Well-being and the Mental Health Continuum Models in an African context”, awarded in 2011. Prior to that, my MSc dissertation focused on the validation of the Values-In-Action Inventory of Strengths (VIA-IS). Between 2007 and 2012 I worked as a Clinical Psychologist at a University-based counselling and therapy centre. During this time, I continued to do research and teach.

Elsa Fourie

My research career started in 1996 on education management (MEd), followed by A management strategy for Quality Assurance in teacher training in South Africa (PhD).

I was then a member of the committee for In-Service teacher training programmes, focusing on quality assurance of these programmes and the implementation thereof.

Maristi Partridge

After completing a degree in Language Practice I worked as a classroom interpreter and freelance language practitioner. I started work at the NWU in 2007 as junior lecturer where I presented modules in Academic Literacy, Language Practice and English Linguistics. The modules that focussed on the influence of various linguistic theories on translation theory contributed to my interest in linguistics.

Karen van der Merwe

I have an interest in the role and function of religion in psychological well-being. This area of interest includes the exploration of culturally informed philosophies of life and their influence on religious and spiritual expression; the role of religion and spirituality in coping and meaning making as well as mindfulness as spiritual practice and psychotherapeutic intervention. I enjoy qualitative research because I am interested in people’s stories and how these express their ways of understanding their lives and how they give meaning to their experiences. 

Kobus Lombard

Both my MEd (1988) and DEd (1992) degrees were obtained from the RAU (now UJ), in the field of teacher education. 

My university career started in 1988 at the Vista University in the Faculty of Education. With the merging of higher education institutions in 2004, I became part of the School of Education of the Vaal Campus of the NWU.  During my university career I lectured several undergraduate and post graduate modules, supervised a number of Masters and Doctoral students and filled various managerial positions.   

Irene Muller

I obtained a B Sc, majoring in Chemistry and Botany at UFS in 1986. After 23 years of teaching in various secondary schools, I started lecturing in January 2010 at the NWU (Vaal).  In 2011 I obtained a B Ed (Honn) in curriculum development and performed a research study on indirect teaching methods in Physical Science. 

Aaron Nhlapo

My academic career started in 2012 when I first joined the NWU as a lecturer. Before that I was  a school head master for nine years.

In my M.Ed degree I focussed on the management of school safety and for my PhD the focus was on the whole school approach to facilities maintenance.

In 2014 i published an international article in collaboration with Prof. M.I Xaba.

Linda Theron

Linda Theron is respected for resilience-focused research that has contributed a more profound understanding of why some South African children and young people do well in life, despite the odds being stacked against them.

Sebastiaan Rothmann

Prof. Ian Rothmann is Director of the Optentia Research Focus Area. His expertise is in the assessment and development of employed and unemployed people’s potential, specifically within multicultural and cross-cultural contexts. His initial research focus was burnout, stress, and coping within multicultural contexts. With the changing intellectual climate in Psychology after 2000 (towards Positive Psychology) his research focus broadened to include work engagement and flourishing of people in work and organisational contexts as well as in non-work contexts.

P Ndlela

Dr Ndlela's field of expertise is South African and African-American Literature.  He is currently working with Professor I.S. Mekoa: (Research Professor in the School of Research and Postgraduate Studies) in a Research Project titled: “Culture, Identity & Nation-Building in South Africa”.

Andrew Manson

I am a Research Professor in the Faculty of Human and Social Sciences, North-West University, Mafikeng Campus. I was a former professor of History and Dean in the  Faculty of Human and Social Sciences, Mafikeng Campus.

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